Worlds from the word' end

Worlds from the word' end
Joanna Walsh
Ed. And other stories

This collection cements Joanna Walsh's reputation as one of the sharpest writers of this century. Wearing her learning lightly, Walsh's stories make us see the world afresh while showing us she has read the world. In 'Like a Fish Needs a . . .' – perhaps the funniest, most freewheeling story ever written about cycling (and Freud and and and . . .) you read shenanigans worthy of Flann O'Brien. Meanwhile, in 'Worlds from the Word's End', Walsh conjures up a country in which words themselves fall out of fashion – something that will never happen wherever Walsh is read.

Acheter chez Tropismes : Worlds from the word' end

The lifters

The lifters
Dave Eggers
Ed. Scholastic

What if dark forces were gathering inches below you as you sat in class or ate a banana? What if it were up to two kids to stop those forces? What if a magical handle could open a door into a hidden underground world? What if the fate of an entire town rested on your shoulders? Gran Flowerpetal is the new kid in the creaky old town of Carousel. (Yup: he is a kid. Don’t be fooled by the name.) There doesn’t seem to be a whole lot going on in Carousel. Well, apart from the crazy sinkholes that swallow entire houses without warning. But below ground, as Gran soon discovers, quite a lot is happening. None of it good. Now it’s up to the Lifters to bring the hope back to Carousel, and stop the whole town from being swallowed up…

Acheter chez Tropismes : The lifters

Not to read

Not to read
Alejandro Zambra
Ed. Fitzcarraldo

In Not to Read, Alejandro Zambra outlines his own particular theory of reading that also offers a kind of blurry self-portrait, or literary autobiography. Whether writing about Natalia Ginzburg, typewriters and computers, Paul Léautaud, or how to be silent in German, his essays function as a laboratory for his novels, a testing ground for ideas, readings and style. Not to Read also presents an alternative pantheon of Latin American literature – Zambra would rather talk about Nicanor Parra than Pablo Neruda, Mario Levrero than Gabriel García Márquez. His voice is that of a trusted friend telling you about a book or an author he’s excited about, how he reads, and why he writes. A standard-bearer of his generation in Chile, with Not to Read Alejandro Zambra confirms he is one of the most engaging writers of our time. (présentation de l'éditeur)

Acheter chez Tropismes : Not to read

Modern nature

Modern nature
Derek Jarman
Ed. Vintage

In 1986 Derek Jarman discovered he was HIV positive and decided to make a garden at his cottage on the barren coast of Dungeness. Facing an uncertain future, he nevertheless found solace in nature, growing all manner of plants. While some perished beneath wind and sea-spray others flourished, creating brilliant, unexpected beauty in the wilderness.

 

Acheter chez Tropismes : Modern nature

These possible lives

These possible lives
Fleur Jaeggy
Ed. New directions

In these strange and mesmerizing essays about three writers—Thomas De Quincey, John Keats, and Marcel Schwob—Fleur Jaeggy, a renowned stylist of hyperbrevity in fiction, proves herself an even more concise master of the essay form, albeit in a most peculiar and lapidary poetic vein. Of De Quincey’s early nineteenth-century world we hear of the habits of writers: Charles Lamb “spoke of ‘Lilliputian rabbits’ when eating frog fricassee,” Henry Fuseli “ate a diet of raw meat in order to obtain splendid dreams,” “Hazlitt was perceptive about musculature and boxers,” and “Wordsworth used a buttery knife to cut the pages of a first-edition Burke.”

Acheter chez Tropismes : These possible lives

WInter

WInter
Ali Smith
Ed. Penguin

From the peerless author of Autumn and How to be both - the second novel in the Seasonal quartet.

Winter? Bleak. Frosty wind, earth as iron, water as stone, so the old song goes. The shortest days, the longest nights. The trees are bare and shivering. The summer's leaves? Dead litter.

The world shrinks; the sap sinks. But winter makes things visible. And if there's ice, there'll be fire.

In Ali Smith's Winter, lifeforce matches up to the toughest of the seasons. In this second novel in her acclaimed Seasonal cycle, the follow-up to her sensational Autumn, Smith's shape-shifting quartet of novels casts a merry eye over a bleak post-truth era with a story rooted in history, memory and warmth, its taproot deep in the evergreens: art, love, laughter.

It's the season that teaches us survival.

Here comes Winter. (présentation de l'éditeur)

Acheter chez Tropismes : WInter

Bluets

Bluets
Maggie Nelson
Ed. Jonathan Cape

Bluets winds its way through depression, divinity, alcohol, and desire, visiting along the way with famous blue figures, including Joni Mitchell, Billie Holiday, Yves Klein, Leonard Cohen and Andy Warhol. While its narrator sets out to construct a sort of ‘pillow book’ about her lifelong obsession with the colour blue, she ends up facing down both the painful end of an affair and the grievous injury of a dear friend. The combination produces a raw, cerebral work devoted to the inextricability of pleasure and pain, and to the question of what role, if any, aesthetic beauty can play in times of great heartache or grief.

Acheter chez Tropismes : Bluets

Autumn

Autumn
Karl Ove Knausgaard
Ed. Vintage

From the author of the monumental My Struggle series, Karl Ove Knausgaard, one of the masters of contemporary literature and a genius of observation and introspection, comes the first in a new autobiographical quartet based on the four seasons I want to show you our world as it is now: the door, the floor, the water tap and the sink, the garden chair close to the wall beneath the kitchen window, the sun, the water, the trees. You will come to see it in your own way, you will experience things for yourself and live a life of your own, so of course it is primarily for my own sake that I am doing this: showing you the world, little one, makes my life worth living. Autumn begins with a letter Karl Ove Knausgaard writes to his unborn daughter, showing her what to expect of the world.

Acheter chez Tropismes : Autumn

Making your own days

Making your own days
Kenneth Koch
Ed. Simon and Schuster

From one of the most esteemed American poets of the twenty-first century comes a celebration of poetry and an invitation for anyone to experience its beauty and wonder. Full of fresh and exciting insights, Making Your Own Days illuminates the somewhat mysterious subject of poetry for those who read it and for those who write it--as well as for those who would like to read and write it better. By treating poetry not as a special use of language but as a distinct language--unlike the one used in prose and conversation--Koch clarifies the nature of poetic inspiration, how poems are written and revised, and what happens to the heart and mind while reading a poem. Koch also provides a rich anthology of more than ninety works from poets past and present. Lyric poems, excerpts from long poems and poetic plays, poems in English, and poems in translation from Homer and Sappho to Lorca, Snyder, and Ashbery; each selection is accompanied by an explanatory note designed to complement and clarify the text and to put pleasure back into the experience of poetry. (présentation de l'éditeur)

Acheter chez Tropismes : Making your own days

Equipment for living

Equipment for living
Michael Robbins
Ed. Simon and Schuster

Brilliant, illuminating criticism from a superstar poet--a refreshing, insightful look at how works of art, specifically poetry and popular music, can serve as essential tools for living. How can art help us make sense--or nonsense--of the world? If wrong life cannot be lived rightly, as Theodor Adorno had it, what weapons and strategies for living wrongly can art provide? With the same intelligence that animates his poetry, Michael Robbins addresses this weighty question while contemplating the idea of how strange it is that we need art at all.

Acheter chez Tropismes : Equipment for living